Mondo.NYC Speaker

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Jake Beaumont-Nesbitt

Jake Beaumont-Nesbitt

Artist Manager & Director of Innovation & Education, IMMF

Jake is an artist manager from London, UK. He also advises artists and technology companies on business strategies.

Jake has worked with self-releasing and signed artists in Asia, Europe and the USA. He has taken self-funded, self-releasing artists to #2 album chart success in the Netherlands, major label deals in the UK, and leading indie label deals in the USA. With a background in financial markets, he consults for rights technology companies and rights holders: his clients have included Beyonce, Rihanna and The Clash. Jake has been part of music industry stakeholder dialogues with WIPO, EU, UK and US policy makers; and regularly speaks on artist management and music industry innovation topics around the world. Jake is Director of Innovation & Education at the International Music Managers Forum (IMMF) connecting artists and managers from 60+ countries.

As part of Project Zero, supporting ocean conservation projects, Jake was involved in the first ever launch of a social token by a registered charity, using Web3 to organize communities, including artist’s fanbases.

Unlocking a Global Artist Knowledge Network, Presented by MMF-US & IMMF

10/11/22, 8:00 PM

MMF-US and its members are part of the global International Music Managers Forum, one of music’s largest networks, covering artists and their representatives in over 60 countries. The moment artists upload a track to the web, they are trading internationally, below the line comments on streaming platforms are posted seamlessly by global audiences united without borders. Artists work globally. However, business models, copyright policies, and where revenue is found varies country by country. Which considerations might artist's businesses take into account when developing international audiences and revenues? Which markets are most interesting? How can artists and their business representatives build their own networks and skills? The world is huge; local knowledge is essential for thinking globally and acting locally.